My Lust for Her…

A difficult form tonight. The ballade (not to be confused with the ballad) is a form of medieval and Renaissance French poetry

The ballade as a verse form typically consists of three eight-line stanzas, each with a consistent metre and a particular rhyme scheme. The last line in the stanza is a refrain. The stanzas are often followed by a four-line concluding stanza (an envoi) usually addressed to a prince. The rhyme scheme is therefore usually ‘ababbcbC ababbcbC ababbcbC bcbC’, where the capital ‘C’ is a refrain.

The many different rhyming words that are needed (the ‘b’ rhyme needs at least fourteen words) makes the form more difficult for English than for French poets.

 (See wikipedia for the full article on the form.)

My lust for her…

I see her form, and much to my delight
She’s unadorned, no trinkets to display,
No clothes about her wrapped to bar my sight
Nor anything but what she wore the day
She came into the world, but more risqué
For all her shapely curves, her woman’s claim
That fuels this man to passionately say
My lust is hers, and hers alone to tame.

And oh, the wicked smile that takes its flight
Across her face might lesser men dismay,
And cause their weaker passions to afright,
Their doubts and inner demons to obey;
Not I, for my desires are not allayed
By such a thing as doubt or fear or shame,
My flames go stronger, rather than decayed.
My lust is hers, and hers alone to tame.

And thus, my need her own seems to incite
As we embrace and with each other play,
As lovers, twisting, writhing in the night
And long into the breaking of the day.
And yet, unspent, our urges don’t away
But grow in power, glory, and in fame –
And as each other’s passions we essay,
My lust is hers, and hers alone to tame.

Then finally, we crest, we rock, we sway,
To rest and comfort in each other’s frame.
She knows it was the truth when I did say
My lust is hers, and hers alone to tame.

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